Posts Tagged ‘ video ’

Jaime Kopke

Second to becoming a coffee drinker at age 27, I consider the experience I had at the Denver Community Museum the most pivotal moment in my life so far. I shit you not. It sounds dramatic and I’ll spare you the details because this post is about Jaime Kopke, the woman who created and ran the DCM.

I met Jaime in 2005 and since then, she’s become one of the people in my life who is like an inspirational compass. She constantly shares information about artists with me and recommends books that contribute to the way I see the world. Plus, she’s a coffee drinker and has a fine appreciation for coffee adventures in Colorado and across the pond. We tend to caffeinate up and plot to reinvent the way people see the world. I love it mostly because I believe we will succeed.

Currently, Jaime is the Director of the Dikeou Collection in Denver and a Creative Producer for Poesy & Praxis. I caught up with Jaime in the belly of a whale downtown (the installation piece by Agathe Snow at the DC) and she was kind enough to talk about coffee and museums with me. Jaime’s approach to the museum experience is in-line with her opinion about how coffee should be available to everyone.

Jaime is exactly like the cup of coffee I had on June 22, 2009 from Dunkin’ Donuts (did you know they use 100% Arabica beans?). That coffee de-fogged my mind and ended the constipation that my brain was suffering from during the previous 24 hours. How do I remember this? I don’t. I wrote about it in my coffee journal. Yes, my coffee journal. Don’t hate.

Watch this video, visit the collection. Maybe I’ll see you at one of the third Friday events that Jaime is starting up at the Dikeou Collection.

I make videos because I love learning about people’s passions, and I enjoy connecting people to people by sharing their stories. While researching coffee (my obsession) over the past four years, I discovered that many creatives rely on coffee as a drug. They love what it does to their brain and how it’s a catalyst for creativity.

Coffee is complex. So are people. Drink up.

Andrew Orvedahl

Andrew Orvedahl’s humor is on the exact level of intelligent that I enjoy. He’s smart, but not pretentious and I’ve never heard him crack a joke that involves sweeping generalizations of housewives or football watching couch potato husbands. Similarly, if Andrew were a coffee, I’d have to say he’d be a quirky Pacamara from El Salvador that’s full of character and is 172 degrees, a temperature that I find most enjoyable.

I remember when I first met Andrew when we were arguing for opposite sides at Buntport’s Great Debate (Dead Man’s Curve or Make-out Point). Andrew was posing as a lawyer type and had done some background research on each of the debaters on my team. As he was going down the line, picking apart our pasts, I hoped he wouldn’t make fun of my last name (had enough of that growing up and really, hadn’t heard anything original in twenty some-odd years); or pick on me for being a woman or Asian (because I have complete control over both of those things, riiight?). Well, he chose not to, which I found a relief. And even though they say all’s fair in comedy and some might argue he should have pulled out ching chong ching or PMS quips on me, he didn’t. Ever since then, my respect for him and his humor has only increased.

Andrew’s one of those people in Denver who I think contributes positively to the city’s culture. He organizes and hosts comedy and storytelling shows every month—they’re one of the reasons why living in Denver is a trillion times more interesting to me than living in Highlands Ranch. His newest show called ‘Randomicity’ debuts tonight at the Underground Music Showcase venue SOBO 151, at 9pm.

I’m glad Andrew was up for talking coffee with me. His interview was the most eventful that I’ve had so far. Not only can you hear his neighbor using the lawnmower, but Andrew’s two year old daughter (whose cuteness kills me) was vigorously typing on the computer for part of the time (you can hear her pounding away on the keyboard at one point) and there was an additional visitor roaming around the room as well. All excellent additions to my less than stellar videotaping skills, which are revealed by my attempt to shoot Andrew in front of a white wall while he’s wearing a white shirt. I am so not awesome! The good news is that I leaned a lesson and will avoid washing out future interviewees!

I make videos because I love learning about people’s passions, and I enjoy connecting people to people by sharing their stories. While researching coffee (my obsession) over the past four years, I discovered that many creatives rely on coffee as a drug. They love what it does to their brain and how it’s a catalyst for creativity.

Coffee is complex. So are people. Drink up.

After you watch the interview, you should really also watch this video, which features his daughter being awesome:

and this one is pretty great too:

These videos were played at one of the Grawlix shows, which are the last Friday of every month.

Brian Colonna

Brian Colonna is a company member at Buntport Theater in Denver and has been a good friend of mine for years. If he were a coffee, he’d undoubtedly be of the Bourbon varietal—a classic old world coffee. I asked him to participate in the Coffee Driven Lives video project because we have this great deal going where I give him excellent tasting coffee on an ongoing basis and in return, he buys me lunch. Why doesn’t he just buy his own coffee and I buy my own lunch? Well, because that would be no fun and anybody who asks that question needs to consider taking a break from logic every so often.

Mmm, hmm.

So, when I arrived to Brian’s home the other morning, the first thing he did was warn me that he hadn’t had any coffee and may not be the most interesting interviewee on earth. That’s okay, because one thing I’ve learned is that peeps who I talk to are always more fascinating than they give themselves credit for. What’s normal for them may be extraordinary to others. Such is life. One thing I know for certain is that Buntport Theater company is far from ordinary and I feel fortunate to have found and be involved with such a cultural gem in this city. I had to cut out much of the random wonderfulness from this video in order to keep it to a reasonable length (maybe there will be an outtake reel from all interviews someday?), but it was nice to hear some new stories about Buntport’s history. Plus, I never knew that Brian believes that “clowning” can “really hit you.” So there’s that. I learned a term from Brian when we went to grab coffee together as well; I had never heard “lifestyle entrepreneur” before, but he introduced me to that term and after looking it up, I decided melikes that approach to living very much.

If you have no other knowledge of Buntport Theater, I think you should know this video will tell you very little. You know what you should do? Make a reservation to watch their Third Tuesday programming this month; it’s The Great Debate and is going to be awesome and nice.

I make videos because I love learning about people’s passions, and I enjoy connecting people to people by sharing their stories. While researching coffee (my obsession) over the past four years, I discovered that many creatives rely on coffee as a drug. They love what it does to their brain and how it’s a catalyst for creativity.

Coffee is complex. So are people. Drink up.

April Charmaine

I’d venture to say that beginning to drink coffee changed the course of April Charmaine’s life forever. Some might settle with coincidence explaining how coffee and dancing came into April’s life at the same time. Most people wouldn’t even give the connection a second thought. However, to one who is coffee obsessed, and dedicates a blog to such things, who has spent years collecting similar stories of how coffee has changed lives, well, to that person, April’s story is a welcome addition to the pile of “People who make their passion their livlihood—with a little help from coffee.”

I recently visited April at Sol Vida Dance Studio, which holds its grand opening next month. In addition to talking coffee, I decided that I must attend one of her Tuesday night Hip-Pop courses before the summer ends and take advantage of the special she is currently offering (tip: all you have to do is mention the “popping off” promo when you go in). Who knows, maybe The B Team will have a reunion battle.

Listening to April talk about her affinity for fusing dance made me realize she’s like an espresso blend that has fragile aromas and a distinct but balanced acidity. Watch this video to hear how April is contributing to the creative scene in Denver:

I make these videos because I love learning about people’s passions and I enjoy connecting people to people by sharing their stories. While researching coffee (my own obsession) over the past four years, I discovered that many creatives in this world rely on coffee as a drug; they love what it does to their brain and how it serves as a catalyst for their creativity.

Coffee is complex, so are people. Drink up.

Kagen Schaefer

Kagen Schaefer may be the only person in this world who has the ability to make me excited about math. Before my recent visit to Kagen’s studio, I’d never witnessed firsthand the beauty that can be produced by carefully calculated equations. Besides watching Vanessa Gould’s breathtaking documentary Between the Folds, my exposure to the art of science was limited.

Kagen is a puzzle artist whose mind creates mathematical problems that he then turns into artwork . Since 2002, he has created numerous wooden boxes, tables and cases for clients around the world.

Snake Box

What I find most impressive is that he has turned his passion into his livelihood; creating puzzles is not just a hobby for Kagen, he lives off his creations and runs his studio as a business.

When I visited Kagen at Ironton, he showed me some of the pieces that he’s currently working on, we talked coffee (he roasts his own and typically brews by using a French press) and I learned that the movie Goonies was his go-to whenever he was home sick as a kid (which may or may not have subconsciously influenced one of the pieces he’s currently working on). Watch this video for a tour of Kagen’s studio:

I make these videos because I love learning about people’s passions and I enjoy connecting people to people by sharing their stories. While researching coffee (my own obsession) over the past four years, I discovered that many creatives in this world rely on coffee as a drug; they love what it does to their brain and how it serves as a catalyst for their creativity.

Coffee is complex, so are people. Drink up.

I really enjoyed talking to Kagen, because although we’ve known each other for years, this visit was the first time I fully understood how complex of a character he is—similar to the Hartmann Geisha coffee that he’s been drinking lately, which has layers upon layers of superb characteristics.

The Lotus Table

 

Pipe Organ Desk

To learn more about Kagen, visit his website.


Event: Mid-Winter Woolly Repair Shop

On January 29th, Bean Again and Poesy & Praxis hosted the Mid-Winter Woolly Repair Shop at Novo Coffee’s roasting facility in Denver. We extended the lifespan of clothing items by patching up moth-eaten, torn and over loved woolly goods. It was a great day, and the first of many social design events that Poesy & Praxis will present—we’re excited for future collaborative projects!